Mar

12

SOME MORE “HAWTHORN” WORK!

Hi, everybody,

This is a other Dutch "Hawthorn" Yamadori I collected near the coast line, close to were I live. I collected it because it had a nice root base and a nice gentle curve in the lower part of the trunk. So I had to cut down the tree considerably to get to the, more or less, correct height in comparison to the thickness and style of the tree. There was not one single branch left on the tree, when I was finished. Even my wife tooled me, I over did it this time! NOT! HIHI! Next season I had plenty long shoots to select my future branches and top from. I wired the branches in there new position and made a new top, in such a way that there would be more taper, in a way the new top would compliment the large wound that was left after the trunk chop! This wound was connected with the natural Shari that runs down the right top side of the tree. This new top grew so hard that it became to strong, long and thick, so last year I cut off the new top, just above a strong side shoot. I than raised this shoot with wire and created a new top with it. I hollowed out the wound I was left with extra deep, only leaving a ring of bark with cambium. This wall of bark is cut on the NORTH and the SOUTH with a V cut! Now you can fold the 2 bark flab's together. With a scalpel I will cut away just enough, so they will fit as best as possible! Than the complete wound was covered with sealing paste and than a piece of plastic was used to hold the two part firmly into place. I have tried this technique many times before and it those not always work as good on all species. But what can I lose? I would have been left with a large scare any way! But it works? I would be left with a natural looking smaller wound! But that is for the future! First some wiring and than repotting this tree.

This is a other Dutch “Hawthorn” Yamadori I collected near the North Sea coast line, close to were I live. I collected it because it had a nice root base and a nice gentle curve in the lower part of the trunk. I had to cut down the tree considerably to get to the, more or less, correct height in comparison to the thickness and style of the tree. When I was finished, there was not one single branch left on the tree, . Even my wife told me, I over did it this time! NOT! HIHI! Next season I had plenty long shoots to select my future branches and top from. I wired the branches in there new position and made a new top, in such a way that there would be more taper, in a way the new top would compliment the large wound that was left after the trunk chop! This top wound was connected with the natural Shari that runs down the right top side of the tree. This new top grew so hard that it became to strong, long and thick! So last year I cut off the new top, just above a strong side shoot. This top was planted in a pot and lived, so their is a other nice Shohin saved from the dustbin! 🙂 I than raised the top shoot with wire and created a new top with it. I hollowed out the wound I was left with extra deep, only leaving a ring of bark with cambium. This wall of bark is cut on the NORTH and the SOUTH or EAST AND WEST with a V cut! Now you can fold the 2 bark flab’s together. With a scalpel I will cut away just enough, so they will fit as best as possible together! Than the complete wound was covered with sealing paste and than a piece of plastic was used to hold the two part firmly into place. I have tried this technique, successfully, many times before, but it those not always work as good on all species. But what can I lose? I would have been left with a large scare any way! But if it works? I will be left with a natural looking smaller wound! But that is for the future! First some wiring and than repotting this tree.

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Above pictures: As you can see in the left picture, the tree has filed his former pot with long roots, so it was saved to repot it now and do some drastic root pruning. In the right picture, you can make out the part off the tap root that I left on for safety when I collected it. These backup roots feed the tree, so it can recover from collecting and grow new feeder roots.

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Above pictures: As you can see in the left picture, the tree has made plenty of new roots above this backup root. So it is safe to remove it with a saw! In the right picture, you can see that the tree fits nicely in its new temporary plastic pot. It is firmly secured and now it will be filled with a mixture of Akadama, Kiryu and Bims. These coastal Dutch’s Hawthorns, originally grow in almost pure sand, so I like there mixture to drain extra well!

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Above picture: The tree in its temporary plastic pot. I am very pleased with the roots and I think it is possible to plant the tree in a more fitting pot, it’s next repotting! The tree needs a lot more branch growth and structure and overall work. But I do think,  looking at the basic as it is now, the tree looks promising to create a nice bonsai from! Time will tell! 🙂

Later,

Hans van Meer.

Info: karamottobonsai@hotmail.com

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Posted in MY WORK | 6 Comments

6 Responses to SOME MORE “HAWTHORN” WORK!

  1. brian mills says:

    Hi Hans strong roots

  2. Hans van Meer says:

    Thanks Brian,
    they are such a joy to work with!
    regards,
    Hans van Meer.

  3. Emil, Sweden says:

    Hi Hans!

    It’s been a long time since I saw any life signs from you, nice to hear you have a good possibility to do something about your back!

    Good work as always and I hope to see you soon somewhere!

    Best Regards
    Emil

  4. Justin says:

    Hey nice… but why did you put it in a plastic pot for now?

    Keep updating please, love the blog

  5. Graham says:

    Hi Hans,
    How long will you leave it in this “training” pot?
    Cheers
    Graham

  6. Hans van Meer says:

    Thanks Emil, yes I am still alive and kicking! 🙂
    Hi Justin, I dissident to repot this tree, that same afternoon and because I did not really know what to aspect underground anymore and this one was just the right size! Now that I know what to aspect next time I repot, I can go look for a super pot!
    Hi Graham,
    at least 2 growing seasons, it depends on how much growth I can get during that time! But maybe I will leave it 3 or 4 years?
    Cheers,
    Hans van Meer.

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